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Showing posts with label Manhattan Project. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Manhattan Project. Show all posts

Monday, August 22, 2016

The Age of Fission Lonnie Clark guest Scotty - Phytoremediation Pr...

Philanthropist Entrepreneur Startup Kills Radiation Organically
Lonnie Clark-The Age of Fission, interviewing Scotty and
the ElectroHemp BioRad process and system that removes 
heavy metal toxins organically. 

Thursday, June 23, 2016

ElectroHorticulture and Phytotechnologies Reduce Heavy Metals in Soil

3 Electrokinetic coupled Phytotechnology articles that support the ElectroHemp phytoremediation techniques the team has developed.
Taking it one step further by growing the plants in a greenhouse ensures that cross contamination and public exposure is eliminated. see the ElectroHemp BioRad Disposal Info


Electrokinetic enhancement on phytoremediation in Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd contaminated soil using potato plants
Coupled electrokinetic remediation–Bioremediation

Electrokinetic enhancement on phytoremediation in Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd contaminated soil using potato plants

Abstract

The use of a combination of electrokinetic remediation and phytoremediation to decontaminate soil polluted with heavy metals has been demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. Potato tubers were planted in plastic vessels filled with Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd contaminated soil and grown in a greenhouse. Three of these vessels were treated with direct current electric field (DC), three with alternative current (AC) and three remained untreated as control vessels. The soil pH varied from anode to cathode with a minimum of pH 3 near the anode and a maximum of pH 8 near the cathode in the DC treated soil profile. There was an accumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd at about 12 cm distance from anode when soil pH was 5 in the DC treated soil profile. There was no significant metal redistribution and pH variation between anode and cathode in the AC soil profile. The biomass production of the plants was 72% higher under AC treatment and 27% lower under DC treatment compared to the control. Metal accumulation was generally higher in the plant roots treated with electrical fields than the control. The overall metal uptake in plant shoots was lower under DC treatment compared to AC treatment and control, although there was a higher accumulation of Zn and Cu in the plant roots treated with electrical fields. The Zn uptake in plant shoots under AC treatment was higher compared to the control and DC treatment. Zn and Cu accumulation in the plant roots under AC and DC treatment was similar, and both were higher comparing to control. Cd content in plant roots under all three treatments was found to be higher than that in the soil. The Pb accumulation in the roots and the uptake into the shoots was lower compared to its content in the soil.


Abstract

Electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation is an innovative technology to decontaminate heavy metal contaminated soil. In this study, the effect of electric current on plant growth and speciation of soil heavy metals has been investigated by pot experiments, and the remediation processes of electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation has been discussed. After Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) grew for 35 d, four voltage gradients (0, 1, 2, 4 V cm−1) of direct-current (DC) were applied timely (8 h d−1) across the soils for 16 d. The extractable soil metals by different extraction methods had a significant redistribution from the anode to the cathode after the treatments. Simple correlation analysis indicated that the correlation coefficients of the extractable soil metals with root metals were better than that with shoot metals. Plant uptake of metals increased by the electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation, and a medium voltage gradient of 2 V cm−1 was the best due to the highest metal accumulation in the plant. Voltage gradient was the most important factor in affecting the plant growth, soil properties and metal concentrations in the soil and plant.

Graphical abstract

Image for unlabelled figure

Highlights

► We study the change of soil properties in different soil sections after experiments. ► Impact mechanism of the combined technique on metal uptake by plant is investigated. ► The extractable soil metals has a significant redistribution form anode to cathode. ► The highest metal accumulation of plant is in the treatment of 2 V cm−1. ► Voltage is the foremost factor in affecting the metal contents in soil and plant.

Key words

  • Electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation
  • Heavy metals
  • Indian mustard
  • Chemical speciation
Corresponding author. Tel.: +86 25 86881180; fax: +86 25 86881000.


Effects of electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation of a multiple-metal contaminated soil on soil metal bioavailability and uptake by Indian mustard  (Citations: 1
Electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation is an innovative technology to decontaminate heavy metal contaminated soil. In this study, the effect of electric current on plant growth and speciation of soil heavy metals has been investigated by pot experiments, and the remediation processes of electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation has been discussed. After Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) grew for 35d, four voltage gradients (0, 1, 2, 4Vcm−1) of direct-current (DC) were applied timely (8hd−1) across the soils for 16d. The extractable soil metals by different extraction methods had a significant redistribution from the anode to the cathode after the treatments. Simplecorrelation analysis indicated that the correlation coefficients of the extractable soil metals with root metals were better than that with shoot metals. Plant uptake of metals increased by the electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation, and a medium voltage gradient of 2Vcm−1 was the best due to the highest metal accumulation in the plant. Voltage gradient was the most important factor in affecting the plant growth, soil properties and metal concentrations in the soil and plant.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

DualPost: Nuclear Cleanup Taxes-Lisa Gibbs on EPA

Lisa Gibbs give telling arguments on how big business experiments on the Public when the Government Agencies such as the EPA turn a blind eye.



The video where she talks about the St Louis Westlake Landfill and the health and safety concerns of the local residents. starts around 13.10 and goes on to talk about thinking out of the box by the Westlake Landfill Group who asked for the United Nations assistance in suing the EPA.



FYI the Manhattan Project nuclear waste was created for the Atomic Nuclear Bomb in St Louis during the Manhattan Project and dropped on Japan long ago, which President Obama just brought to the forefront of the news media on his last visit to Japan.







Spice Solar shares this tidbit of info:


New nuclear technology and safety procedures will hopefully prevent another disaster (although that’s what we thought after TMI). But what happens at a plant that isn’t crippled by a disaster? Surprisingly, even cleaning up existing nuclear plants is outrageously expensive. Ever wonder why every electric bill has a line item called “Nuclear Decommissioning?” It costs about $750 million to shut down existing plants in a process that can take 20 years or more. Around the world, nuclear plant operators have budgeted over $1 trillion dollars to clean up existing nuclear reactors (think about how many solar panels and batteries we can buy for $1 trillion dollars).

Once they are up and running, the economics of a nuclear plant are pretty good. But they are expensive to build, expensive to decommission, and outrageously expensive to clean up after a disaster. Compare that to a “solar spill” – which is basically a very sunny day. For these economic reasons, from a utility’s perspective the pendulum has swung completely way from nuclear power towards solar. Please join me on this week’s Energy Show as we delve into the long term costs of nuclear energy.


Friday, April 8, 2016

Phytoremediation Info via SciTech Connect

 An emerging technology for cleaning contaminated soils and shallow groundwater is phytoremediation, an environmentally friendly, low- cost, and low-tech process. 
Phytoremediation encompasses all plant- influenced biological, chemical, and physical processes that aid in the uptake, degradation, and metabolism of contaminants by either plants or free-living organisms in the plant`s rhizosphere. 
A phytoremediation system can be viewed as a biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the soil and below-ground ecosystem for subsequent productive use.
ElectroHemp BioRad Disposal Tanks
ElectroHemp BioRad Disposal Tanks


Using Phytoremediation to Clean Up Contamination at Military Installations

During and following World War II, wastes from the production of munitions and other military materials were disposed of using the best available practices acceptable at that time. However, these disposal methods often contaminated soil and groundwater with organic compounds and metals that require cleanup under current regulations. An emerging technology for cleaning contaminated soils and shallow groundwater is phytoremediation, an environmentally friendly, low- cost, and low-tech process. Phytoremediation encompasses all plant- influenced biological, chemical, and physical processes that aid in the uptake, degradation, and metabolism of contaminants by either plants or free-living organisms in the plant`s rhizosphere. A phytoremediation system can be viewed as a biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the soil and below-ground ecosystem for subsequent productive use. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been conducting basic and applied research in phytoremediation since 1990. Initial greenhouse studies evaluated salt-tolerant wetland plants to clean UP and reduce the volume of salty `produced water` from petroleum wells. Results of these studies were used to design a bioreactor for processing produced water that is being demonstrated at a natural gas well in Oklahoma; this system can reduce produced water volume by about 75% in less than eight days, representing substantial savings in waste disposal cost. During 1994, ANL conducted a TNT plant uptake and in situ remediation study in a ridge-and-furrow area used for the disposal of pink water at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant.
SciTech Connect Conference: Using Phytoremediation to Clean Up Contamination at Military Installations

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http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/761921 pg 41:93

4.5 Regulatory Acceptance Current State Regulators are generally looking for a scientifically defensible basis for performance expectations. Results of bench-scale or greenhouse tests using site-specific soils are compelling evidence for predicting performance. It is also important to be realistic about the amount of time required for cleanup, acknowledging where phytoremediation is being used as a long-term remediation approach. For long-term remediation, the cost-effectiveness of the approach may be a factor. In addition, it will be important to show the controls in place to protect both ecological and human receptors. The fate of the contaminants (e.g., mercury and the volatilization processes) should also be predicted. Regulators will be looking for contingency plans in case of failure of the proposed phytoremediation technology and the willingness of the end user to implement that alternate technology. It was suggested that we confirm predicted performance by conducting one to two year field studies. Such studies should be prepared to implement contingency remedies if field performance is inadequate to achieve cleanup goals in a reasonable timeframe. The potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors should be addressed by B-12 conducting a screening risk assessment and by comparing predicted exposures to reference values in the literature. Gaps • Regulatory acceptance of phytoremediation technologies is a critical gap. • Meeting risk-based limits may require measures to limit exposure in addition to removing contamination. • It is not known whether the timeline for deployment of a phytoremediation technology matches DOE’s regulatory requirements for cleanup.

Friday, March 25, 2016

URGENT!! PLEASE SHARE THIS WITH YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS.



This concerns all people throughout the World. Nuclear Waste may not be in your backyard ...yet.

We are in dire need of your help! The article below was written by the Attorney General of Missouri. West Lake Landfill is located in Bridgeton, MO.

This landfill contains illegally dumped nuclear waste from the Manhattan Project which created the first atomic bomb.

There is an underground fire burning just hundreds of feet from the radioactive material. The landfill sits on the New Madrid Fault, at prime risk for an earthquake, It is 1.2 miles from the Missouri river and the ground water has recently become its own Superfund site. It is located in an area known as tornado alley. St. Louis Lambert Airport is less than 6 miles from West Lake Landfill. It is surrounded by businesses and subdivisions. It is heavily populated.

The EPA just released a study showing the radioactive waste is more widespread than they thought.

We have a bill in the House of Representative, H R 4100, to turn the clean up of this waste over to the U S Army Corps of Engineers. This is our best hope. But Congressman Frank Pallone is holding up the bill. It has passed the Senate so we really need it to pass the House. Please call Congressman Pallone and ask him to support H R 4100. 732-571-1140 is his New Jersey office and 202-225-4671 is his Washinton D C office. You can also send a message to two of his staffers,Janice.Fuller@mail.house.gov and/or Brian.Laughlin@mail.house.gov.

Any help is greatly appreciated. We need to unite across the World and stop nuclear production before we destroy our planet.

 
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Terra Johnson- DouglasJames Patrick and 6 others posted in West Lake Landfill.
 
   
Terra Johnson- Douglas
March 25 at 10:06am